When I lent my services to a collegue who was working on a film about 12 years ago, I was introduced to the world of cnc. I remember watching this huge machining centre milling out a slab of mdf and turning it into a fantastic set of gears. I knew that it would have taken me hours to achieve the same thing with traditional power tools. I decided then that I would invest in a cnc router for my own business Oxenham Design. At that time I could turn on a computer, but even to check email seemed like a crazy set of operations. I persevered and learned every piece of relevant software I could get my hands on. I am now fortunate enough to be using Vectric's ASPIRE software, and Techno cnc routers, which has helped us to create some amazing projects, both in part, or in full. I thought that this blog would be a great place to share "behind the scenes" adventures with the software, materials and equipment we use, as well as the projects we build.

Monday, 30 May 2016

It Aint the Size of Your Kitchen That Matters to the Ladies!

Before I get to the next post, I thought I would post a small behind the scenes video of our last location shoot for my next short film! Woot! Woot!

Believe it or not, this shoot ran from 7:30pm to 2am, last Saturday night. It was soo much fun to do. It's kind of fun for me to watch, as I missed a lot of what was going down! But the pre-pro takes a lot of time and effort, and ate up most of my free time. Securing a location, doing the graphic design for the fake newspaper, getting it printed, breaking out the shot lists, and making sure the schedules work with everyone involved!
All in all, I had such a great time! I have met a ton of new people, whom I hope to continue to have relationships with long after the shooting wraps. So here's to all of you guys, and all your hard work!

But while all this was goin' down, we were working at the shop on a kitchen set for a popular kids toy. I can't mention the toy, but I can document the build! The set was something that I designed, based off of a couple of artist concepts, and color designs. The set, and all it's pieces, are a fairly basic set, and all of it was drawn up in either Corel, or Aspire, depending on where I wanted to end up.
The first step, as always, was to nail out a floor plan, then I could base all the elevations off of this basic map. All of this will be 2-D profile cuts from both 1/4" and 1/8" styrene sheets. 1/4 and 1/8" styrene sheets you say?!? What?!? That's right, this is a miniature kitchen! At a total size of 3 feet X 3 feet!
First up was the fridge. Not for any other reason, except that those were the parts that our Techno CNC finished first! I actually split this job off onto both machine at the same time. The smaller pieces were all cut on the table top one, while our big machine cut the larger sections like the walls and floors.
The little counter stools were all cut on the small machine, from 1/4" styrene. I used 1/4" acrylic rod for the stool posts, set into the appropriate sized hole in the bases and stool tops.
With the fridge and stools done, I moved on to the kitchen sink. Again, all simple 2D stuff. The faucet spout was fashioned from 1/8" brass rod, with the oversized sprayer head made from half an acrylic sphere bead, that we somehow have a bazillion of. The little tap handle were ground down miniature wire marettes.


 It wasn't long before these guys were ready for some paint! I really like to use ABS lacquer on anything styrene that we make. It eats right into the material, and can be sanded, if need be, in less than 10 minutes! This makes for some fast turn arounds!

8)
JWO





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